Select Science Article – 3D Human Spheroids as a Predictive Model in Drug Discovery

3D Human Spheroids as a Predictive Model in Drug Discovery

June 13, 2018 – Dr. Ryan Gordon, VP of Business Development and Commercialization at StemoniX, discusses the potential of human spheroids in predictive assays.

In a field divided between in vivo and in vitro studies, scientists often weigh out the respective caveats before designing an experiment. While 2D in vitro experiments fall short in recapitulating the structural complexities of the human body, the pharmacological compounds tested for safety and efficacy through in vivo studies using animal models often fail human clinical trials. As a solution to overcome these shortcomings, scientists have recently dedicated efforts towards growing a 3-dimensional, self-organizing human organ in a dish – the human spheroid.

In this SelectScience® interview, we speak with Dr. Ryan Gordon, VP of Business Development and Commercialization at StemoniX, a company that specializes in supplying homogenous 3D spheroids. Gordon discusses the applications for organoids, particularly 3D cortical spheroids, in early drug discovery and elaborates on factors that can make or break reproducible data in pharma.

StemoniX was founded on the premise of creating physiologically-relevant human-based in vitro models to improve predictivity in drug discovery,” says Gordon. “Our microOrgan platforms better reflect the structure, morphology, and function of the organs they represent, and we do this scalably to meet the high-throughput requirements in drug discovery and toxicology screening.

About StemoniX

StemoniX® is transforming how medicine is discovered. By using skin or blood to create functioning microHearts® and microBrains®, StemoniX is making it possible to test medication on humans without that medication ever entering their bodies. This method of drug testing will speed up the search for new cures and enable the ability to test drug effectiveness on an individual person, so medicine works correctly the first time. For more information visit www.stemonix.com.

 

Interested in getting in touch? Send us an email info@stemonix.com and we will be happy to get back to you.

Source: http://www.selectscience.net/